Dana Velasco Murillo

Associate Professor

Murillo Book

Murillo Book

I joined the Department of History in 2012. I received my PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles (2009). Prior to my appointment at UCSD, I was assistant professor of Latin American History at Adelphi University (2011-2012) and UC Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Irvine (2009- 2011).

My research interests focus on recovering the histories of native peoples and women in early Latin America (1492 to 1810). My current work is centered in colonial Mexico’s northern silver-mining district. My first book, Urban Indians in a Silver City: Zacatecas, Mexico, 1546-1810 (Stanford University Press, 2016), examined how ethnically diverse indigenous migrants from central and western Mexico recreated native communities and indigenous identities in Zacatecas, New Spain’s most important silver mining town. Urban Indians received Honorable Mention for the Judy Ewell Award from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies and Honorable Mention for the 2017 Social Sciences Book Award presented by the Mexico Section of the Latin American Studies Association

My current book project, War of Fire and Blood in Colonial Mexico’s Chichimecatlalli1546-1616, reconsiders New Spain’s northern sixteenth-century frontier wars from the perspectives of the region’s indigenous populations. I am developing a third monograph, which takes a transatlantic turn, focusing on return migration to Spain.

I am also working on several other projects involving silver mining, including an article on the role of indigenous prospectors in the development of silver production and an edited volume on the new mining historiography. I have a forthcoming chapter, “Silver Mines and Borderlands in New Spain” in Borderlands of the Iberian World (Oxford University Press, 2017).

I also co-edited City Indians in Spain’s American Empire: Urban Indigenous Society in Colonial Mesoamerica and Andean South America, 1600-1830, in which I also co-authored a chapter. My work appears in the Hispanic American Historical Review and Ethnohistory. I have an article in History Compass (2017) on the role of modern local history in Latin American historiography.

Currently, I am on the Executive Committees of the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies and the American Society for Ethnohistory. I have served as a reviewer for several journals and presses. 

 

Books

--War of Fire and Blood in Colonial Mexico's Chichimecatlalli, 1546-1616 (in progress)

--Urban Indians in a Silver City: Zacatecas, Mexico, 1546-1810 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2016) http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25827

Honorable Mention, Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies

The Judy Ewell Award for the best publication (book or article) on women’s history or written by a woman, and published in 2016, that began as a RMCLAS presentation

Honorable Mention, Latin American Studies Association

Social Sciences Book Award Presented by the Mexico Section (2017)

Reviews of Urban Indians: [1]

--City Indians in Spain's American Empire: Urban Indigenous Society in Colonial Mesoamerica and Andean South America, 1521-1830, co-edited with Mark Lentz and Margarita R. Ochoa (Brighton, England: Sussex Academic Press, 2012). http://www.sussex-academic.com/sa/titles/SS_First_Nations/VelascoMurillo.htm

Paperback version 2014.

Reviews of City Indians: [1] [2] [3]

Articles and Book Chapters

“Modern Local History in Spanish American Historiography” (forthcoming, History Compass)

“Silver Mines and Borderlands in New Spain” in Borderlands of the Iberian World, eds. Cynthia Radding and Danna Levin Rojo (forthcoming, Oxford University Press)

“For the Last Time, Once and for All”: Indians, Violence, and Colonial Authority in the Colonial City, Zacatecas, Mexico, 1587-1628,” Ethnohistory 63.1 (2016): 47-70

“Laboring Above Ground:  Indigenous Women in New Spain’s Silver-Mining District, Zacatecas, Mexico, 1620-1770,” The Hispanic American Historical Review 93.1 (2013): 3-32

Received the 2013 Ligia Parra Jahn Award from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies

“Mine Workers and Weavers:  Afro-Indigenous Labor Arrangements and Interactions in Puebla and Zacatecas, 1600-1700.”  Co-authored with Pablo Sierra.  In City Indians, 104-27

“The Creation of Indigenous Leadership in a Spanish Town: Zacatecas, Mexico, 1609-1752,” Ethnohistory 56.4 (2009): 669-98

  • Early Latin America
  • Colonial Mexico
  • Indigenous Peoples
  • Women and Gender

Lower Division Courses

HILD 14:        Film and History in Latin America

MMW13:       New Ideas and Cultural Encounters

Upper Division Courses

HILA   100:    Latin America Colonial Transformations

HIUS 114A:    History of Early California

HILA   117:    Race, Class, and Gender in Colonial Latin America

HILA   134:    Indians of Colonial Latin America

Undergraduate Colloquia

HILA 161:      Women in Colonial Latin America

Graduate Colloquia

HILA 261:      Women in Colonial Latin America

HIGR 247:      Latin American History: Methods and Practice

Faculty